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Research Reports


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Test/Research Results Insecticide Research Survey Research
Research in Russia Dispersal Information Biosurveillance
Host Range Information Economic Impact Ash Tree Genetics and Ecology

Test/Research Results

  • Factors affecting the survival of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees infested by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis)
    2012 - Kathleen S. Knight, John P. Brown and Robert P. Long

    The article is on the survival analysis of ash trees in Ohio. According to Kathleen Knight, the main take-home message was that ash trees actually died slightly faster in stands with lower densities of ash, the opposite of what the authors thought would happen. This is just the speed of mortality, not the % mortality (almost all the ash trees die eventually no matter what).
  • AIBS coverHistorical Accumulation of Nonindigenous Forest Pests in the Continental United States
    December 2010 - American Institute of Biological Sciences
    Nonindigenous insects and pathogens continue to become established in US forests with regularity despite regulations intended to prevent this, according to a study published in the December 2010 issue of BioScience. The study, by a team led by Juliann E. Aukema, of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis in Santa Barbara, California, (including MSU's Deb McCullough), found that nonindigenous insects are being newly detected in US forests at a rate of about 2.5 per year, and high-impact insects and pathogens that cause significant effects in forests, including tree death, are being newly detected every 2 to 2.5 years. The rate of detection of harmful forest invaders seems to have increased in the past two decades.
  • Risk Assessment of the Movement of Firewood within the United Statespdf (PDF, 3,315 KB)
    May 2010 - USDA APHIS
    Exotic and native forest pests such as Agrilus planipennis (emerald ash borer), Anoplophora glabripennis (Asian longhorned beetle), and others cause serious damage to urban and natural forests in the United States. These pests and many others disperse various distances through multiple pathways including movement of nursery stock and firewood. Firewood is a raw forest product that is widely utilized and moved throughout the United States with relatively limited consideration of the potential pests within or the associated risks. We conducted an assessment and examined factors that may affect the risk associated with the movement of firewood such as users, movement, insects and diseases, potential impact to natural and urban forests, and trends in firewood use.
  • Geographic Origin of North America's Emerald Ash Borerpdf (PDF, 0.08MB)
    Jim Smith, Michigan State University
    This research is looking for the origins of EAB found in North America by looking at the genetic similarities in samples of EAB populations from Asia and comparing them to North American populations.
  • Studies to Develop an Emerald Ash Borer Survey Trappdf (PDF, 0.09MB)
    Jason B. Oliver, Joe Francese, Vic Mastro, Ivich Fraser, Dave Lance, Nadeer Youssef
    Studies to develop an emerald ash borer survey trap through trap location, seedling tree damage, trap design evaluation.
  • Developing a Fast, Inexpensive Method to Extract and Analyze Imidacloprid Residue in Plant Tissuepdf (PDF, 0.06MB)
    Phil Lewis and Deborah G. McCullough
    A cheap, rapid method to analyze chemical residue in treated trees is necessary in order to best assess efficacy of different treatments.
  • Genetic Analysis of Emerald Ash Borerpdf (PDF, 0.02MB)
    Jim Smith, Bob Haack and Leah Bauer
    Estimate the geographic origin of emerald ash borer populations in Asia that gave rise to EAB in North America
  • Exploration for Emerald Ash Borer in Chinapdf (PDF, 0.03MB)
    Houping Liu, Toby R. Petrice, Leah S. Bauer, Robert A. Haack, Ruitong Gao, and Tonghai Zhao
    Research on the study of the natural enemy complex of EAB in China

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Insecticide Research

Research on methods to control EAB began in 2002. Research is ongoing, and as methods are developed, more information will be available.

  • "Slow Ash Mortality" – SLAM Pilot Project
    Description: The SLAM project is a collaborative effort involving Michigan State University, the USDA Forest Service, USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), Michigan Technological University (MTU), the Michigan Dept. of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD), the Michigan Dept. of Natural Resources (MDNR), and Michigan Conservation Districts in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The goal of the SL.A.M. pilot project in Michigan's Upper Peninsula is to delay and slow the expansion of ash mortality by reducing populations of the beetle in newly-infested sites, outside of known EAB infestations.
  • Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Potential Side Effects of EAB Insecticides pdf (PDF, 311KB)
    February 2011
    Research and Extension Specialists from Michigan State University, the Ohio State University OARDC and Extension, and University of Minnesota Extension have put together a comprehensive publication that addresses questions and concerns regarding insecticide use to control emerald ash borer.
  • Control of Emerald Ash Borer with Microbial Insecticidespdf (PDF, 0.05MB)
    Revised 4/14/04
    Leah S. Bauer, Houping Liu, and Deborah L. Miller - studying the efficacy of registered microbial insecticides for EAB control in environmentally sensitive habitats
  • Evaluation of Perma Guard D-20 and Imidacloprid to Control Emerald Ash Borerpdf (PDF, 0.02MB)
    Robert A. Haack and Toby R. Petrice - This study tested the effectiveness D-20 by Perma Guard (Albuquerque, NM) in controlling emerald ash borer
  • Research abstracts and other information addressing the EAB problem in North America.

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Survey Research

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Research in Russia

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Survival of EAB

  • Risk Assessment of the Movement of Firewood within the United Statespdf (PDF, 3,315 KB)
    May 2010 - USDA APHIS
    Exotic and native forest pests such as Agrilus planipennis (emerald ash borer), Anoplophora glabripennis (Asian longhorned beetle), and others cause serious damage to urban and natural forests in the United States. These pests and many others disperse various distances through multiple pathways including movement of nursery stock and firewood. Firewood is a raw forest product that is widely utilized and moved throughout the United States with relatively limited consideration of the potential pests within or the associated risks. We conducted an assessment and examined factors that may affect the risk associated with the movement of firewood such as users, movement, insects and diseases, potential impact to natural and urban forests, and trends in firewood use.
  • Emerald Ash Borer Survival in Firewoodpdf (PDF, 0.03MB)
    2003 - Robert A. Haack and Toby R. Petrice
    This study looked at firewood infested with emerald ash borer, to determine the survival rate.
  • Survival of Emerald Ash Borer in Chipspdf (PDF, 0.02MB)
    2003 - Deborah G. McCullough, Therese M. Poland and David Cappaert
    This study was to determine survival of EAB in chips of different sizes.

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Biosurveillance

  • Cerceris fumipennis? pdf (PDF, 2MB)
    2009 - A Biosurveillance Tool for Emerald Ash Borer. Canadian Food Inspection Agency

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Dispersal Information

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Host Range Information

  • Host Range of Emerald Ash Borerpdf (PDF, 0.02MB)
    Robert A. Haack, Toby R. Petrice, Deborah L. Miller, Leah S. Bauer and Nathan M. Schiff
    In 2003, foliage of several trees and shrubs as food for emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, adults were evaluated in a series of no-choice and choice tests that were conducted indoors in Michigan
  • Host Range and Host Preference of Emerald Ash Borerpdf (PDF, 0.02MB)
    2003 - Deborah G. McCullough, Andrea Agius, David Cappaert, Therese Poland, Debbie Miller and Leah Bauer
    Our first objective is to evaluate alternate species of concern to determine whether they are acceptable to ovipositing adult beetles and whether they are suitable for larval development. We also assessed alternate hosts with a series of field tests.

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Economic Impact

  • Economic Impacts of Non-Native Forest Insects in the Continental United Statespdf (PDF, 245KB)
    January 2013 - Juliann E. Aukema, et. al.
    The article examines how they developed a novel modeling approach that maximizes the use of available data, accounts for multiple sources of uncertainty, and provides cost estimates for three major feeding guilds of non-native forest insects. For each guild, they calculated the economic damages for five cost categories and estimated the probability of future introductions of damaging pests.
  • EAB Economic Impact (OSU)pdf (PDF, 0.10MB)
    January 2007 - Matt Bumgardner, Drew Todd and Davis Syndor, the Ohio State University
    Outlines the potential economic impacts of EAB on Ohio, U.S., and communities.

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Ash Tree Genetics and Ecology

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