Welcome to EAB University!

Where the experts share their knowledge and research about EAB and other topics related to other forest pests, diseases and management.
All Webinars are now available below or on the EABU YouTube Channel.

For more information, contact: Robin Usborne | Michigan State University


Current Session


Topic Original Webinar Date

Reporting Spotted Lanterfly: How and What You Report Depends on Where You Live

Matthew A. Travis, SLF Policy Manager, USDA APHIS PPQ

Thursday, October 20th, 2022 11:00 AM

In this EAB University webinar, Matthew Travis from the USDA APHIS PPQ outlines the steps necessary to report Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) when you find it. Information on how to identify it, and what is currently being done to manage and mitigate this pest is also outlined.

New Tools for Detecting Exotic Invasive Forest Pests

Sarah Wegmeuller, Dept. of Forestry & Wildlife Ecology, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison

Thursday, October 27th, 2022 11:00 AM

This webinar outlines the various tools being created and developed to assist in locating wooded areas and determining the extent of infestations of invasive forest pests. Sarah Wegmueller, University of Wisconsin, Madison, graduate student in forest ecology, focuses on developing software that uses remotely sensed data to help forest managers and forest health professionals. Her work is funded by the USDA Forest Service.

How Long Must I Protect My Ash Trees from Emerald Ash Borer?

Cliff Sadof, entomologist, Purdue University

Thursday, November 03rd, 2022 11:00 AM

"You will always have to manage emerald ash borer populations once they are in your area." Cliff Sadof, Purdue University entomologist who has been working on EAB since its discovery in Indiana in 2003, discusses what research on long-term populations of EAB on ash trees has revealed as far as managing this invasive wood pest. This is part of the EAB University webinar series.

Promotions

The Urban Wood Network's mission is to inform, collaborate, and connect to build business and consumer confidence in the urban wood industry. It strives to:
  • Build regional and national awareness of the urban wood market by bringing together urban wood efforts in Illinois, Michigan, Missouri and Wisconsin and beyond, providing leadership and sharing information.
  • Strengthen the urban wood supply chain within the four states with the goal of increasing the amount of urban wood that can be reclaimed, processed, and sold.
  • Build a common understanding, language, commitment, and eventually, brand for the urban wood marketplace.


Archived Webinars


Topic Original Webinar Date

EAB 101: The History of EAB and Basic Information

11/12/09


EAB 101 for 2013

Amy Stone from the Ohio State University Extension, Annemarie Nagle from Purdue University, and Robin Usborne from Michigan State University

05/21/13


EAB 101 – What Happened, and What's Happening Now

Amy Stone, Ohio State University Extension Educator & Robin Usborne, Communications Manager, Michigan State University

05/19/14


2015 EAB Toolkit Update and the Best of EAB University

Cliff Sadof, Purdue University

03/12/15


National Perspective on EAB

Joe Beckwith, USDA APHIS

12/13/16

This series of webinars are aimed at municipal decision-makers and their professional affiliates, such as city managers, attorneys, planners and elected officials, as they are confronted with the possibility – or reality – of emerald ash borer infesting their community’s ash trees. This information would also be of interest to professional associations that municipal employees turn to for advice and guidance.

Topic Original Webinar Date

EAB 101: The History of EAB and Basic Information

11/12/09


ABATe -- A Strategic Response to EAB

Brad Beaubien, AICP, Ball State University

11/15/12


Municipal EAB Management Series Your EAB Management Options vs. the "Death Curve"

Jim Zwack, M.S., The Davey Institute

11/19/12


Municipal EAB Management Series Topic Memo to City Managers

Chad Tinkel, Manager of Forestry, City of Fort Wayne, IN

11/29/12


EAB will Hit Your Budget...

Richard Hauer, UW -Stevens Point and Cliff Sadof, Purdue University

02/14/13


EAB Liability and Communications Issues

Margo Ely & Joe McElroy from the City of Naperville, IL

03/12/13


The Impact of Urban Trees

Geoffrey Donovan, PhD, research forester with the USDA Forest Service

03/26/13


Pros and Cons of Urban Mechanized Tree Removal

Don Peterson, president of Renewable Resource Solutions, LLC, in Crystal Falls, MI

04/10/13


EAB Tools and Tactics for Communities

Gary Johnson, Extension professor of forestry at the University of Minnesota

04/16/13


Municipal Management Wrap Up

Joe Boggs, Ohio State University Extension

05/08/13


EAB 101 for 2013

Amy Stone from the Ohio State University Extension, Annemarie Nagle from Purdue University, and Robin Usborne from Michigan State University

05/21/13


EAB 101 – What Happened, and What's Happening Now

Amy Stone, Ohio State University Extension Educator & Robin Usborne, Communications Manager, Michigan State University

05/19/14

Additional information:


2015 EAB Toolkit Update and the Best of EAB University

Cliff Sadof, Purdue University

03/12/15


Developing a Municipal Strategy for Managing EAB

Josh Behounek, Coordinator of Urban Forestry Services with Davey Tree Co., Columbia, MO

12/06/16


National Perspective on EAB

Joe Beckwith, USDA APHIS

12/13/16


Topic Original Webinar Date

Overview of Invasive Forest Pests and Diseases in North America

Jodie Ellis, Purdue University

02/03/11


Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Brad Onken, USDA Forest Service, Morgantown, W. Va.

03/10/11


Viburnum Leaf Beetle

Curtis Young, the Ohio State University

04/21/11


Diagnosing Thousand Cankers Disease

Ned Tisserat, Colorado State University

05/19/11


ABATe -- A Strategic Response to EAB

Brad Beaubien, AICP, Ball State University

11/15/12


Municipal EAB Management Series Your EAB Management Options vs. the "Death Curve"

Jim Zwack, M.S., The Davey Institute

11/19/12

Additional information:


Municipal EAB Management Series Topic Memo to City Managers

Chad Tinkel, Manager of Forestry, City of Fort Wayne, IN

11/29/12


EAB will Hit Your Budget...

Richard Hauer, UW -Stevens Point and Cliff Sadof, Purdue University

02/14/13

Additional information:


EAB Liability and Communications Issues

Margo Ely & Joe McElroy from the City of Naperville, IL

03/12/13


The Impact of Urban Trees

Geoffrey Donovan, PhD, research forester with the USDA Forest Service

03/26/13


Pros and Cons of Urban Mechanized Tree Removal

Don Peterson, president of Renewable Resource Solutions, LLC, in Crystal Falls, MI

04/10/13


EAB Tools and Tactics for Communities

Gary Johnson, Extension professor of forestry at the University of Minnesota

04/16/13


Municipal Management Wrap Up

Joe Boggs, Ohio State University Extension

05/08/13


Invasions by Non-native Insect Pests and Arboriculture

Mike Raupp, University of Maryland

09/26/13


Using Semiochemicals to Detect and Monitor Invasive Ambrosia Beetle in Hardwood Forests

Matt Ginzel, PhD, from Purdue University

04/24/14


Asian Longhorned Beetle: Update from Ohio

Joe Boggs, Ohio State University Cooperative Extension

02/19/15


Invasive Species? We have an APP for THAT!!

Joe LaForest, IPM and Forest Health Coordinator, University of Georgia

04/09/15


Walnut Twig Beetle & Thousand Cankers Update

Matt Ginzel, Purdue University

10/29/15


Beech Bark Disease: Efforts to look for and cultivate Host Plant Resistance

Jennifer Koch and Paul Berrang, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station

01/28/16


How Tree Choice Can Cause the Next Invasive Species Disaste

John Ball, South Dakota State University

11/15/16


Developing a Municipal Strategy for Managing EAB

Josh Behounek, Coordinator of Urban Forestry Services with Davey Tree Co., Columbia, MO

12/06/16


Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in Michigan

John Bedford, Michigan Dept. of Agriculture and Rural Development

03/02/17


Biology, Ecology and Management of Ambrosia Beetle Vectors and their Diseases

Chris Ranger, USDA ARS Horticultural Insects Research Lab, Wooster, OH

03/07/17


Thousand Cankers Disease: Threatening the Nation's Walnut Trees

Matthew Ginzel, Purdue University

10/19/17


Recognizing and Reporting Exotic Forest Insects

Cliff Sadof, Purdue University, Entomologist

03/01/18


Hemlock Woolly Adelgid and Biocontrol Efforts

Mark Whitmore, Cornell University, Forest Entomologist

03/08/18


The State of Spotted Lanternfly

Heather Leach, Penn State University

09/13/18


Gypsy moth: past, present, future

David Adkins, Ohio Dept. of Ag.

09/27/18


Update on Ticks: Diseases and Prevention

Tim McDermott, Extension Educator, Franklin County, OH

02/12/19


Replanting After a Crisis: Worcester's Recovery from Asian Longhorned Beetle

Ruth Seward, Worcester Tree Initiative

03/05/19


Is This the End for American Beech?

David Burke and Daniel Volk

02/26/20


Long-term impacts and management of emerald ash borer

Kathleen Knight, Research Ecologist, USDA Forest Service, Delaware, OH

03/04/20


Eastern: Invasive Forest Pest Q & A

Cliff Sadof, Purdue University

04/08/20


Forest Invaders to Watch for and How to Manage Them Part 1: Emerald Ash Borer, Thousand Cankers Disease, and Asian Longhorned Beetle

Cliff Sadof, Carrie Tauscher, and Elizabeth Barnes (Purdue University)

04/22/20


Forest Invaders to Watch for and How to Manage Them Part 2: Spotted Lanternfly, Gypsy Moth, and Hemlock Wooly Adelgid

Cliff Sadof, Carrie Tauscher, and Elizabeth Barnes (Purdue University)

04/29/20


Integrated Chemical & Bio Control of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid: A Resource Manager's Guide

Albert Bud Mayfield, USDA Forest Service, Southern Region. Additional authors are Scott M. Salom, Kenton Sumpter, Tom McAvoy, Noel F. Schneeberger and Rusty Rhea.

05/13/20


Tick Tock - A Timely Update on Ticks, Diseases and Prevention

Timothy McDermott, Ohio State Univ. Extension Educator, Franklin County, OH

10/15/20


What We Know So Far -- How Feeding & Mating Behavior are Related to <em>Lycorma delicatula</em> Flight Dispersal

Tom Baker, Dept. of Entomology, Center for Chemical Ecology, Penn State University, University Park, PA

10/29/20


Invasive Jumping Worms: The Impact of a New Soil Invader

Brad Herrick, Ecologist/Research Program Manager, UW-Madison Arboretum

11/19/20


Topic Original Webinar Date

Long-term impacts and management of emerald ash borer

Kathleen Knight, Research Ecologist, USDA Forest Service, Delaware, OH

03/04/20

The results of 14 years of monitoring ash mortality and forest ecosystems in Ohio and Pennsylvania show how EAB has impacted these landscapes. Rare “lingering” ash trees have been identified and studied to understand long-term survival prospects for ash. Integrated pest management strategies, including breeding of ash trees with tolerance to EAB, show promise in management of EAB.

Eastern: Invasive Forest Pest Q & A

Cliff Sadof, Purdue University

04/08/20


Forest Invaders to Watch for and How to Manage Them Part 1: Emerald Ash Borer, Thousand Cankers Disease, and Asian Longhorned Beetle

Cliff Sadof, Carrie Tauscher, and Elizabeth Barnes (Purdue University)

04/22/20

Something chewing up your tree trunks? This webinar will cover the basics of identification and treatment of three major invasive woodborers: emerald ash borer, Asian longhorned beetle, and thousand cankers disease and the identification of their host plants.

Forest Invaders to Watch for and How to Manage Them Part 2: Spotted Lanternfly, Gypsy Moth, and Hemlock Wooly Adelgid

Cliff Sadof, Carrie Tauscher, and Elizabeth Barnes (Purdue University)

04/29/20

What’s that on your tree?!? We’ll tell you about how to identify, treat, and where to find three invasive species to watch out for on the outside of your trees: spotted lanternfly, hemlock wooly adelgid, and gypsy moth.

More about HWA here


Integrated Chemical & Bio Control of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid: A Resource Manager's Guide

Albert “Bud” Mayfield, USDA Forest Service, Southern Region. Additional authors are Scott M. Salom, Kenton Sumpter, Tom McAvoy, Noel F. Schneeberger and Rusty Rhea.

05/13/20

Download supplementary document.


Tick Tock – A Timely Update on Ticks, Diseases and Prevention

Timothy McDermott, Ohio State Univ. Extension Educator, Franklin County, OH

10/15/20

This presentation will include a general background with a particular focus on the exotic East Asian tick, also known as the longhorned tick or bush tick. Dr. McDermott will cover where it is known to be in the US, what favorable conditions it prefers, and what you can do to protect yourself. First detected in 2017 in New Jersey, this summer, the tick was found in Ohio and Kentucky.

What We Know So Far -- How Feeding & Mating Behavior are Related to Lycorma delicatula Flight Dispersal

Tom Baker, Dept. of Entomology, Center for Chemical Ecology, Penn State University, University Park, PA

10/29/20

This presentation involves the study of flight dispersal of Lycorma delicatula in PA -- are there predictable directional and distance components that could help predict new locations to which the infestations may spread? In 2017 and 2018, adults were observed launching themselves into the wind from all types of host and non-host trees, or from porches, posts and other human-made structures.

Invasive Jumping Worms: The Impact of a New Soil Invader

Brad Herrick, Ecologist/Research Program Manager, UW-Madison Arboretum

11/19/20

Jumping worms are invading forests and horticultural landscapes throughout the United States. These Asian earthworms modify soil structure and chemistry, nutrient dynamics, soil food webs, litter depth, and plant health. This talk will share information on general earthworm biology and identification, impacts, control options, and the latest research findings.



Topic Original Webinar Date

2010 EAB Awareness Week: Ways to Get The Word Out

04/08/10


Neighbors Against Bad Bugs volunteer group

Jodie Ellis, Purdue University

05/12/11


Save Money and Ash Trees Through Organizing Neighborhoods: Theory and Case Studies

Adam Witte, Exotic Forest Pest Educator, from Purdue University

04/10/14


The History of EAB in New York State and Community Responses

Mark Whitmore, PhD, Cornell University Forest Entomologist

12/18/14


Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

Jill Johnson, Midwest Forestry Coordinator, USDA Forest Service

09/17/15


EAB for Homeowners: Managing EAB, Individuals to Neighborhoods

Cliff Sadof, Purdue University

09/28/17


Resources for Jumpstarting Outreach on Invasive Species

Leigh Greenwood, The Nature Conservancy

02/22/18


EAB for Homeowners

Jodie Ellis, Purdue University

01/01/70



Topic Original Webinar Date

Utilization of Ash in the Wake of EAB

02/04/10


What Happens After Ash Is Gone? Planning Diversity

04/01/10


Wood Utilization Options for Urban Trees Infested by Invasive Species

Brian Brashaw, Director of the Wood Materials and Engineering Program at the Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota Duluth; and Robert Ross, Project Leader at the USDA Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, WI

12/04/14


Update of EAB Woodland Population and Damage Dynamics

Kathleen Knight, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station

03/24/16


Characteristics of Trees Used to Replace Ash

Bob Schutzki, Michigan State University

11/08/16


After EAB: Encouraging Regrowth of a Healthy Forest

Kathy Smith, Ohio State University

10/12/17


Wood Utilization Post-Emerald Ash Borer: An Update

Jessica Simons, SE Michigan Resource Conservation and Development

03/22/18


Managing ash trees post-emerald ash borer

Duke Energy

10/11/18


Dead Ash Dangers and Considerations for Risk and Removal

Timothy Walsh, The Davey Tree Expert Company

04/02/19



Topic Original Webinar Date

Long-term Impacts and Management of Emerald Ash Borer

Kathleen Knight, Research Ecologist, U.S. Forest Service

02/03/22

The emerald ash borer, an invasive insect, has spread from its initial introduction in Michigan and killed millions of ash trees across the region. All six ash species native to its introduced range are susceptible to this pest, and the effects of EAB differ in the different kinds of ecosystems inhabited by these different ash species. Our long-term monitoring program has provided insights into the impacts of EAB on forests and on the long-term dynamics of ash species. Looking to the future, integrated pest management strategies can be used in situation-specific combinations to reduce and mitigate effects of EAB.

The biology and management of the invasive spotted lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula

Holly Shugart, PhD. Postdoctoral Scholar, Pennsylvania State University

02/24/22

The biology of the invasive spotted lanternfly poses a uniquely challenging threat to many agricultural crops, ornamentals, and, to a lesser extent, forests. Spotted lanternflies are highly polyphagous, can inhabit a wide climatic range, and thus have the potential to become established in many regions of the United States. Additionally, SLF females often lay their eggs on personal vehicles, commercial trucks, train cars, and many other items, all of which increase the probability that SLF may be accidentally moved into new habitat ranges. Successful management incorporate an integrative approach including: a community education & reporting system, selected insecticide applications by state and federal agencies, and education, training, and permitting of commercial and business operations moving in and out of quarantine zones. The complex biology of this adaptable insect pest requires a multi-disciplinary approach and there is much still to learn about SLF biology.

Firewood Rules, Certifications, and Recommendations across the USA

Leigh Greenwood, Forest Health Program Director, North America Region, The Nature Conservancy

03/01/22

The federal deregulation of emerald ash borer in January 2021 was widely expected to lead to many changes in the regulatory environment around firewood in the USA. This webinar will highlight the release of a new report written by staff of The Nature Conservancy’s Don’t Move Firewood campaign, covering what regulations and recommendations are in place a year after the EAB deregulation was finalized. We will describe how the current regulatory environments applying to the inter- and intra-state movement of firewood vary greatly in type and prevalence across the United States. The dynamic situation of many forest pests, coupled with the different challenges faced by the state agencies’ statutory authorities and priorities, forest conditions, and unique geographies, have all combined to create a complex regulatory mosaic- and as a result, a very challenging outreach environment.

The worst kind of snowbird: the invasive of Asian longhorned beetle in South Carolina

David Coyle, Assistant Professor and State Extension Specialist, Clemson University

03/03/22

The Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (ALB), was found in South Carolina in May 2020, which now represents the southernmost infestation in North America. Eradication efforts are underway, but several challenges persist due to the novel climate and environment in which ALB has established. This talk will provide a refresher on ALB biology and identification, as well as established and potential eradication methods being used in South Carolina. We will discuss how ALB likely arrived in the Deep South, and also why the threat of more ALB movement and new infestations is unlikely to cease.

Changing the common name of the non-native forest pest Lymantria dispar (Formerly “gypsy moth”)

Jonathan Walter, University of Virginia

03/09/22

In July 2021, the Entomological Society of America decertified “gypsy moth” as the official common name of the non-native forest pest Lymantria dispar in the United States. This decision set in motion a process to rename the species. While renaming species is not uncommon, this case is particularly noteworthy and complex due to L. dispar’s status as a high-profile pest with major research, regulatory, management, and public outreach activities. A decision is expected shortly on the proposed new common name, “spongy moth,” which derives from common names used in its native range and francophone Canada and refers to the sponge-like characteristics of L. dispar egg masses. This talk will address why a new common name was needed, the process for selecting a new name, and next steps for implementing the name change.

Tree of Heaven: Management and Identification

Lenny Farlee, Extension Forester, Purdue University

03/31/22

Tree-of-Heaven, Ailanthus altissima, is an aggressive invasive plant causing in harm in urban and rural environments. Tree-of-Heaven is also a preferred host to an expanding invasive insect, Spotted Lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula. The dual threat posed by Tree-of-Heaven is motivating landowners and managers to control this invasive tree, but some techniques could make an infestation worse than it already is. We will outline several approaches to the control and management of Tree-of-Heaven to help you plan a successful strategy.

Tick Talk - An Update on Tick Research

Timothy S. McDermott, DVM, The Ohio State University

04/07/22

Tim McDermott, who previously presented information on tick research, is providing an update on what's going on in the world of ticks that may be of interest to anyone who make come in contact with this pest.

Tim just published a Tick Fact Sheet on the Asian Longhorned Tick; “VME-1035-Asian Longhorned Ticks in Ohio” which is now available on Ohioline at https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/vme-1035


Forest Pest Damage from the Carbon Sequestration Perspective

Leigh Greenwood, Forest Health Program Director, North America Region, The Nature Conservancy

05/05/22

Both native and non-native forest insects and diseases across the contiguous United States are reducing the ability of the nation’s forests to capture and store carbon dioxide. This webinar will describe a study published in Fall 2021 in Frontiers in Forests and Global Change that calculated forests damaged by insects sequestered 69% less carbon than undamaged forests, while those affected by disease sequestered 28% less carbon. The webinar will briefly cover the overarching findings of the study, and then go into depth on what it means from the invasive forest pest perspective- including how to bring this issue to light when discussing prevention and management of forest pests, and what improvements to current actions could further mitigate these sequestration losses.

Breeding for EAB-Resistance: What Does the Future Look like for Ash?

Jennifer Koch, Research Biologist, US Forest Service

05/26/22

EAB threatens the survival of ash trees in the U.S. where it is a common hardwood species especially in riparian and wetland forests. Ash was also used extensively for soil conservation (including wind breaks) and in urban green spaces and streets. Surviving, or “lingering”, ash trees that had maintained healthy canopies for at least two years after all other large ash trees had died were identified in natural forests long-infested by EAB. EAB egg bioassay experiments confirmed that these trees have an increased level of resistance due to defense responses, including death of early instar larvae, larvae with significantly lower weights, or leaves less preferred for feeding by EAB adults. This webinar discusses research now being done to further understand this phenomenon and other findings to develop tree-improvement programs that could be successful in producing EAB resistant seed. Longer term goals include combining the best performing progeny from many families into a second generation seed orchard, so that the seed produced may be used for restoration plantings.



Topic Original Webinar Date

Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Deregulation and Continuation of APHIS EAB Biological Control Program

Herb Bolton, National Policy Manager for Emerald Ash Borer, APHIS

03/18/21

This webinar will cover the recent federal domestic deregulation of emerald ash borer (EAB). Herb Bolton will discuss what regulatory actions the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has ended since deregulation, and the continuation of the APHIS EAB program for biological control, EAB IPM and biological control research, and communication and outreach to the public on firewood. Ben Slager will give an overview of the APHIS EAB biological control program, the status of the program nationally, and how states and other partners can get involved in the release and recovery of the EAB parasitoids.

The economics of area-wide ash surveillance, treatment, and removal strategies to slow the spread of emerald ash borer in urban forests

Robert G. Haight, USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, St. Paul, MN

04/01/21

The emerald ash borer (EAB) is one of the most economically and environmentally damaging invasive species ever to reach the United States. Economic damage of EAB is most severe in cities that lose abundant high-value ash trees growing along streets and in yards. Pest management and economic models suggest that an area-wide approach across all ownerships, including surveillance for early detection, treatment of ash trees with systemic insecticides, and removal of infested ash trees, yields the greatest benefits at the lowest costs. In this talk, Bob Haight will present research on the economics of area-wide strategies in Minneapolis/Saint Paul metropolitan region, the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba, and the state of New Jersey. The key findings for resource managers are:
  1. Surveillance for early detection of infested trees pays off. Waiting to apply surveillance and management risks the buildup of the EAB population causing more damage and economic loss.
  2. Once surveillance identifies infested trees, cost-effective actions include treating newly infested trees and removing highly infested trees. If the budget is limited, treating newly infested trees is the priority.
  3. For risk averse managers who want to minimize the risk of overwhelming ash mortality, the cost-effective strategy is to monitor and remove ash trees in the vicinity of infestations.
  4. Cooperation among city governments and private landowners can increase benefits for all.

MTE Oak Wilt Management and Control

Tommy Stueck III, Forest Health Forester, Menominee Tribal Enterprises

04/08/21

Oak wilt is a deadly disease of oaks found throughout the Midwest and into the South. The speaker will cover: Northern Pin Oak Management vs Northern Red Oak Management, Surveying Techniques, Pocket Marking Technique, Oak Wilt ID, Bruhn’s Root Graft Model, Types of Treatments, and Success Rates.

Detecting and Monitoring Invasive and Non-Native Species from NEON Pitfall Traps

Michael D. Weiser, University of Oklahoma

04/22/21

NEON (the National Ecological Observatory Network) uses pitfall traps to collect ground beetles (Carabidae) at 47 sites across the continental USA, Hawaii, Alaska, and Puerto Rico. NEON technicians remove these beetles and retain all other pitfall organisms as “Invertebrate Bycatch.” Using a combination of next-generation metagenomic sequencing and high-resolution digital imaging we have developed processes to non-destructively sample and identify taxa from the ethanol storage media. We are able to use these data to detect and monitor range expansions in some non-native species.

Gypsy moth: Everything you need to know in half an hour

Cliff Sadof, Elizabeth Barnes of Purdue University, Department of Entomology, and Carrie Tauscher of Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry

04/28/21

When does gypsy moth kill trees? When don’t you have to worry? Learn the latest in key information about gypsy moth including: management, current distribution, preventing spread, basic biology, host-plant identification, and more!

Spotted lanternfly: Everything you need to know in half an hour

Cliff Sadof, Elizabeth Barnes of Purdue University, Department of Entomology, and Carrie Tauscher of Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry

04/29/21

Spotted lanternfly is a destructive pest that impacts over 70 species of plants. Learn the latest information about this pest including: current distribution, management, monitoring, basic biology, host-plant identification, and more!

Emerald ash borer: Everything you need to know in half an hour

Cliff Sadof, Elizabeth Barnes of Purdue University, Department of Entomology, and Carrie Tauscher of Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry

05/05/21

Emerald ash borer is widespread across the Midwest but ash trees can be protected from it. Once those trees die, they become extremely dangerous. Learn the latest information on: management, managing EAB-killed trees, biocontrol programs, basic biology, host-plant identification, and more!

Asian longhorned beetle: Everything you need to know in half an hour

Cliff Sadof, Elizabeth Barnes of Purdue University, Department of Entomology, and Carrie Tauscher of Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry

05/06/21

Asian longhorned beetle is a death sentence to the trees it infests. Learn the latest on: current distribution, monitoring, basic biology, host-plant identification, and more!

Thousand cankers disease: Everything you need to know in half an hour

Cliff Sadof, Elizabeth Barnes of Purdue University, Department of Entomology, and Carrie Tauscher of Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry

05/12/21

Should you be concerned about this disease of walnut trees? Learn the latest about thousand cankers disease including: distribution, management, monitoring, basic biology, host-plant identification, and more!

Hemlock woolly adelgid: Everything you need to know in half an hour

Cliff Sadof, Elizabeth Barnes of Purdue University, Department of Entomology, and Carrie Tauscher of Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry

05/13/21

Hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) is a deadly pest of hemlock trees. Learn the latest about HWA: current distribution, biocontrol programs, management, monitoring, basic biology, host-plant identification, and more!


Topic Original Webinar Date

Tick Tock – A Timely Update on Ticks, Diseases and Prevention

Timothy McDermott, Ohio State Univ. Extension Educator, Franklin County, OH

10/15/20

This presentation will include a general background with a particular focus on the exotic East Asian tick, also known as the longhorned tick or bush tick. Dr. McDermott will cover where it is known to be in the US, what favorable conditions it prefers, and what you can do to protect yourself. First detected in 2017 in New Jersey, this summer, the tick was found in Ohio and Kentucky.

Invasive Jumping Worms: The Impact of a New Soil Invader

Brad Herrick, Ecologist/Research Program Manager, UW-Madison Arboretum

10/20/22

Jumping worms are invading forests and horticultural landscapes throughout the United States. These Asian earthworms modify soil structure and chemistry, nutrient dynamics, soil food webs, litter depth, and plant health. This talk will share information on general earthworm biology and identification, impacts, control options, and the latest research findings.

What We Know So Far -- How Feeding & Mating Behavior are Related to Lycorma delicatula Flight Dispersal

Tom Baker, Dept. of Entomology, Center for Chemical Ecology, Penn State University, University Park, PA

10/29/22

This presentation involves the study of flight dispersal of Lycorma delicatula in PA -- are there predictable directional and distance components that could help predict new locations to which the infestations may spread? In 2017 and 2018, adults were observed launching themselves into the wind from all types of host and non-host trees, or from porches, posts and other human-made structures.

Lessons Learned from a Test of an Emerald Ash Borer Urban SLAM Program

Cliff Sadof, Dept. of Entomology, Purdue University

11/05/22

Urban SLAM, or Slowed Ash Mortality, is an approach to managing emerald ash borer with fewer pesticides. Although this approach has been tested rigorously in the rural forests, operational tests of this approach are lacking in urban forests. In this webinar I will review the result of a six-year study that shows how the starting condition of the forest, ash species composition, density of trees, and choice of pesticide can influence the outcome of this approach.

Dicamba/2,4-D & Trees: Old Herbicides Causing New Problems

Robbie Doerhoff, Forest Entomologist, Missouri Department of Conservation

11/12/22

Dicamba and 2,4-D have traditionally been used during the early part of the growing season, when trees and other sensitive plants are still dormant. With the release of soybean varieties tolerant of these herbicides, summer applications are resulting in tree and native plant injury on a landscape level. This webinar will discuss the history of this issue and illustrate herbicide injury on trees.

Responses of non-native species to climatic change and their implications for management

11/19/22

The establishment and subsequent abundance of non-native species, such as introduced pests and the natural enemies imported to combat them, is in part determined by the climatic suitability of the novel habitat. For non-native species that have been established for decades, shifting climatic regimes could cause deviations from historical patterns of abundance. I will discuss some potential mechanisms for how climate change might alter host-parasitoid dynamics, using the invasion of, and importation biological program against, larch casebearer in North America as a case study.


Topic Original Webinar Date

Is This the End for American Beech?

David Burke and Daniel Volk

02/26/20


Long-term impacts and management of emerald ash borer

Kathleen Knight, Research Ecologist, USDA Forest Service, Delaware, OH

03/04/20

The results of 14 years of monitoring ash mortality and forest ecosystems in Ohio and Pennsylvania show how EAB has impacted these landscapes. Rare “lingering” ash trees have been identified and studied to understand long-term survival prospects for ash. Integrated pest management strategies, including breeding of ash trees with tolerance to EAB, show promise in management of EAB.

Eastern: Invasive Forest Pest Q & A

Cliff Sadof, Purdue University

04/08/20


Forest Invaders to Watch for and How to Manage Them Part 1: Emerald Ash Borer, Thousand Cankers Disease, and Asian Longhorned Beetle

Cliff Sadof, Carrie Tauscher, and Elizabeth Barnes (Purdue University)

04/22/20

Something chewing up your tree trunks? This webinar will cover the basics of identification and treatment of three major invasive woodborers: emerald ash borer, Asian longhorned beetle, and thousand cankers disease and the identification of their host plants.

Forest Invaders to Watch for and How to Manage Them Part 2: Spotted Lanternfly, Gypsy Moth, and Hemlock Wooly Adelgid

Cliff Sadof, Carrie Tauscher, and Elizabeth Barnes (Purdue University)

04/29/21


Integrated Chemical & Bio Control of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid: A Resource Manager's Guide

Albert “Bud” Mayfield, USDA Forest Service, Southern Region. Additional authors are Scott M. Salom, Kenton Sumpter, Tom McAvoy, Noel F. Schneeberger and Rusty Rhea.

05/13/21


Topic Original Webinar Date

Putting Ash Wood to Good Use - Lessons from the Urban Wood Network

Don Peterson, executive director of the Urban Wood Network

10/02/19

The Urban Wood Network is a regional urban wood organization dedicated to building urban wood organizations and businesses. Don will discuss how networking together benefits local urban wood economies for cities, towns and their residents and business owners. He will present municipal models used by Urban Wood Network members that have allowed them to reduce costs associated with disposal of EAB-affected ash trees through increased wood utilization. These models demonstrate more than just saving trees from a waste stream, they also bolster local industries.

Update on Emerald Ash Borer Biocontrol

Juli Gould, USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)

10/09/19

More information coming.

Life After Shipment: Sudden Oak Death and the Nursery Industry

Janna Beckerman, Purdue University

10/16/19

In 2019 Phytophthora ramorum-infested plants were found in plant nurseries in Indiana, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Washington. This talk focuses on the diagnosis and etiology of Phytophthora ramorum, and provides tactics for the management and mitigation of Phytophthora species in the landscape.

The Unusual Case of Minnesota and EAB

Val Cervenka, MN DNR; Brian Palik, USDA Forest Service, N. Research Station, Grand Rapids, MN; Paul Dubuque, MN DNR

11/20/19

Minnesota has more ash trees than any other state in the country with more than 1.2 billion ash trees and more than 1 million acres of black ash. These forests present unique management challenges due to high water tables, remote access and frozen soil requirements for timber operation. New research conducted by the USFS and the University of Minnesota on ecological impacts of different harvesting methods has stimulated a reevaluation of black ash forest management. A review of black ash native plant communities, harvest levels, silviculture practices and case studies will be presented.


Topic Original Webinar Date

Update on Practical Emerald Ash Borer Management

Cliff Sadof, Purdue University

02/05/19

Emerald ash borer has been tearing through the trees of North America for more than 15 years. In that time it has caused massive destruction to our forests, but we have also learned more effective ways to manage it. This talk will cover the progress that’s been made in the fight against EAB and how you can apply improved management techniques to your own yard or in your tree care business.

Update on Ticks: Diseases and Prevention

Tim McDermott, Extension Educator, Franklin County, OH

02/12/19

Diseases vectored to producers, livestock and companion animals have dramatically increased in the last several years. New invasive tick species have been discovered and existing species are moving into previously unknown host ranges. Get an update on the state of tick species and the diseases they vector and learn how to develop a personal protective plan for your family, livestock and companion

Back by Popular Demand Update on Practical Emerald Ash Borer Management

Cliff Sadof, Purdue University

02/27/19

NOTE: Because so many were not able to attend Cliff Sadof's first webinar on Feb. 5, he has graciously agreed to do another live presentation of this webinar. He will present the same information as the first webinar, and participants will be able to ask question live) Emerald ash borer has been tearing through the trees of North America for more than 15 years. In that time it has caused massive destruction to our forests, but we have also learned more effective ways to manage it. This talk will cover the progress that’s been made in the fight against EAB and how you can apply improved management techniques to your own yard or in your tree care business.

Replanting After a Crisis: Worcester’s Recovery from Asian Longhorned Beetle

Ruth Seward, Worcester Tree Initiative

03/05/19

Asian longhorned beetle is a death sentence for any tree it infests. In order to successfully recover from it, cities and communities must be strategic about the trees they choose to replant and how they work together to bring back their urban forests. In Massachusetts, the Worcester Tree Initiative (WTI) was formed in 2009 in order to help replant the 30,000 trees that were initially cut in the Worcester area following an ALB infestation. WTI continually engages with residents in the ALB Zone by offering community planting opportunities as well as tree care education programs. Through partnerships with the City of Worcester Forestry Department, the Dept of Conservation and Recreation and the community at large, 30,000 trees were successfully replanted but the work of WTI remains relevant today as a community advocacy and engagement program of Tower Hill Botanic Garden. Learn how to use the lessons learned in this highly impactful program in your own response to invasive ins

Dead Ash Dangers and Considerations for Risk and Removal

Timothy Walsh, The Davey Tree Expert Company

04/02/19

Injuries and fatalities when felling whole trees is on the rise. Ash trees impacted by the emerald ash borer pose unique hazards and challenges. This presentation will walk through how to identify and mitigate some of the hazards relating to working near or on ash trees.

Emerald Ash Borer: Perspective from a Recently Infested State

Nate Siegert, US Forest Service

04/16/19

The emerald ash borer invasion has advanced across the Northeast over the last decade, with the first detections occurring in western New York in 2009 and the most recent detections in Maine in 2018. Presently, infestation across the region may be characterized as mix of generally infested areas, newly infested locations, and expanding satellite infestations, with many areas yet to be invaded. The spatial and temporal dynamics of the emerald ash borer invasion along the leading edge from New York to Maine will be discussed, including a review of selected management activities, updates on recent changes, and future direction of management and regulatory work in light of reduced funding and potential federal deregulation


Topic Original Webinar Date

The State of Spotted Lanternfly

Heather Leach, Penn State University

09/13/18


Gypsy moth: past, present, future

David Adkins, Ohio Dept. of Ag.

09/27/18


Managing ash trees post-emerald ash borer

Duke Energy

10/11/18


Asian Longhorned Beetle

Phil Baldauf from the USDA APHIS

10/18/18


Lingering Ash: EAB resistant ash trees?

Jennifer Koch, USFS

10/25/18


Topic Original Webinar Date

Resources for Jumpstarting Outreach on Invasive Species

Leigh Greenwood, The Nature Conservancy

02/22/18


Recognizing and Reporting Exotic Forest Insects

Cliff Sadof, Purdue University, Entomologist

03/01/18


Hemlock Woolly Adelgid and Biocontrol Efforts

Mark Whitmore, Cornell University, Forest Entomologist

03/08/18


Determining Impacts on Wildlife From Emerald Ash Borer Infestations of Black Ash Forests

Alexis Grinde, PhD, University of Minnesota, Duluth, Wildlife Biologist

03/15/18


Wood Utilization Post-Emerald Ash Borer: An Update

Jessica Simons, SE Michigan Resource Conservation and Development

03/22/18


Planning and Timing are Critical for Saving Your Urban Ash Forest From EAB

Cliff Sadof, Purdue University, Entomologist

03/28/18


Topic Original Webinar Date

EAB for Homeowners: Basic Biology and Why You Need to Plan

Cliff Sadof, Purdue University

09/21/17


EAB for Homeowners: Managing EAB, Individuals to Neighborhoods

Cliff Sadof, Purdue University

09/28/17


EAB Management and Pollinator Safety

Reed Johnson, Ohio State University

10/05/17


After EAB: Encouraging Regrowth of a Healthy Forest

Kathy Smith, Ohio State University

10/12/17


Thousand Cankers Disease: Threatening the Nation’s Walnut Trees

Matthew Ginzel, Purdue University

10/19/17


Topic Original Webinar Date

Chemical Control for EAB: What Works, What Doesn't Work, and Why

by Cliff Sadof, Dept. of Entomology, Purdue University

02/21/17


Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in Michigan

by John Bedford, Michigan Dept. of Agriculture and Rural Development</td>

03/02/17


Biology, Ecology and Management of Ambrosia Beetle Vectors and their Diseases

by Chris Ranger, USDA ARS Horticultural Insects Research Lab, Wooster, OH

03/07/17


Utilizing Community Street Tree Surveys in an Early Detection Rapid Response Program

by Tivon Feeley, Forest Health Program Leader, Iowa Dept. of Natural Resources

03/14/17


An Update on Rearing, Releasing and Recovery of EAB Paras

by Ben Slager, Director of the USDA APHIS Biological Control Rearing Facility, Brighton, MI

03/21/17


Topic Original Webinar Date

Characteristics of Trees Used to Replace Ash

Bob Schutzki, Michigan State University

11/08/16


How Tree Choice Can Cause the Next Invasive Species Disaster

John Ball, South Dakota State University

11/15/16


Managing YOUR Local EAB Situation

Cliff Sadof, Department of Entomology, Purdue University

11/29/16


Developing a Municipal Strategy for Managing EAB

Josh Behounek, Coordinator of Urban Forestry Services with Davey Tree Co., Columbia, MO

12/06/16


National Perspective on EAB

Joe Beckwith, USDA APHIS

12/13/16


Topic Original Webinar Date

Beech Bark Disease: Efforts to look for and cultivate Host Plant Resistance

Jennifer Koch and Paul Berrang, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station

01/28/16


Setting EAB Management Priorities in Maryland

Ann Hairston Strang, Maryland Department of Natural Resources Forest Service

02/11/16


Staging an Urban EAB Infestation to Improve Protection and Planning Efforts

Cliff Sadof, Department of Entomology, Purdue University

02/25/16


EAB Preparedness and the Early Years in Colorado

Kathleen Alexander, Boulder City Forester and Rob Davis Denver City Forester

03/10/16


Update of EAB Woodland Population and Damage Dynamics

Kathleen Knight, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station

03/24/16


Is Firewood Still a Vector of Invasives? A Case study of Firewood Movement Through the New Hampshire Speedway<

Piera Siegert, State Entomologist, New Hampshire Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture

04/14/16


Emerald ash borer biology, ecology, management, and implications for natural and urban forest areas in the Southeast

Dr. Dan Herms, Professor and Chariperson, Department of Entomology, The Ohio State University From Sothern Regional Extension Forestry

04/20/16


Topic Original Webinar Date

Effects of EAB Treatment on Pollinators

Reed Johnson, Ohio Agriculture Research and Development Center

10/01/15


Manage EAB, or Manage the Forest?

Mark Abrahamson, Minn. Department of Agriculture

10/15/15


Walnut Twig Beetle &amp; Thousand Cankers Update

Matt Ginzel, Purdue University

10/29/15


Biological Control of EAB: Putting it into Perspective

Roy van Driesche, University of Massachusetts

11/12/15


Fringe Tree EAB Infestation Update

Don Cipollini, Wright State University

12/03/15


Topic Original Webinar Date

2015 EAB Toolkit Update and the Best of EAB University

Cliff Sadof, Purdue University

03/12/15


Developing EAB and Ash Management Plans for PA

Donald A. Eggen, Forest Health Manager, Pennsylvania DCNR, Bureau of Forestry

03/19/15


Invasive Species? We have an APP for THAT!!

Joe LaForest, IPM and Forest Health Coordinator, University of Georgia

04/09/15


This Website provides reliable, objective and timely information from researchers, personnel affiliated with numerous universities, state and federal agencies, educators and outreach specialists in the USA and Canada. Information is reviewed and approved by the website content managers and researchers affiliated with the Michigan State University Dept. of Entomology, the Dept. of Forestry and MSU Extension. Our goal is to help you find answers to questions about EAB, either directly or through links we provide to many other EAB-related websites. Please check this site often because information changes frequently. Funding to support this website is provided by the USDA Forest Service.


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